Captain Scarlet's next bike

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pittsy
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Re: Captain Scarlet's next bike

UcR wrote: " But then the aim was to travel rather than arrive. "

A man after me own art.

Navy Boy
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Re: Captain Scarlet's next bike

pittsy wrote:
UcR wrote: " But then the aim was to travel rather than arrive. "

A man after me own art.

Quite!

I couldn't agree more.

kharli
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Re: Captain Scarlet's next bike

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WqQ_FIsouGY
Is that captain scarlet riding that bike ?

unconventional rebel
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Re: Captain Scarlet's next bike

pittsy wrote:
UcR wrote: " But then the aim was to travel rather than arrive. "

A man after me own art.

I always saw you as an artful man Mr Pittsy.

Going on a BIG travel in 6 weeks. LA to Washington, just under a month, a bike and 4000 odd miles across the US of A. I genuinely cannot wait. YIPPEE!
(No tent this time as the missus will be riding pillion - on the condition that motels are involved....)

I can imagine the good Cap'n galloping along on one of them horses too.

pittsy
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Re: Captain Scarlet's next bike

unconventional rebel wrote:
pittsy wrote:
UcR wrote: " But then the aim was to travel rather than arrive. "

A man after me own art.

I always saw you as an artful man Mr Pittsy.

Going on a BIG travel in 6 weeks. LA to Washington, just under a month, a bike and 4000 odd miles across the US of A. I genuinely cannot wait. YIPPEE!
(No tent this time as the missus will be riding pillion - on the condition that motels are involved....)

I can imagine the good Cap'n galloping along on one of them horses too.

;)

Have a great trip. Sounds brilliant.

(Horses? Never catch on)

unconventional rebel
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Re: Captain Scarlet's next bike

Thanks Pittsy.

Horses, hopelessly outdated too IMO. Lack power (1 horsepower!!! For goodness sake, my Moblylette has 2 1/2hp!), rubbish suspension, limited range, high maintenance and the exhaust note is frankly and plainly undesirable.

Not bad off road I suppose, but crossing rivers seems to be their only real advantage, and we have bridges for that sort of thing nowadays.

pittsy
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Re: Captain Scarlet's next bike

unconventional rebel wrote:
Thanks Pittsy.

Horses, hopelessly outdated too IMO. Lack power (1 horsepower!!! For goodness sake, my Moblylette has 2 1/2hp!), rubbish suspension, limited range, high maintenance and the exhaust note is frankly and plainly undesirable.

Not bad off road I suppose, but crossing rivers seems to be their only real advantage, and we have bridges for that sort of thing nowadays.

And their emissions are not to be sniffed at.

LOL

Actually, they may yet have their day again. Who knows.

Navy Boy
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Re: Captain Scarlet's next bike

Come on CS. You've been very quiet recently. What's the latest on your next machine?

Captain Scarlet
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Re: Captain Scarlet's next bike

I might have some money coming my way before the end of the year, suffice to buy a new steed, but its not a given.

At the moment (this week anyway...) I'd probably still find it hard not to buy an R1200GS-LC. If I was still in Europe-shire, the RT would be hard to ignore too.

Although the new bike still doesn't appear to be totally foolproof. I know of someone who has had a new engine and gearbox done under warranty already.

The US is a big country and Adventure bikes, tourers and bagger cruisers make strong arguments for themselves. I really quite fancy an Indian Chief, but there's no dealers in my state and that may take some time to change. A top machine though.

Harley still own the market in the land of the Whopper, and my last couple (Fat Bob, Road King Classic) were lovely to ride and never missed a beat. I might be able to combine my love of Milwaukee Iron with my new found interest in electric bikes...

Who'd have thought of it - sacrileage even - Harley Davidson makes an electric motorcycle - behold the "Livewire"! Discuss! :-D

http://project.harley-davidson.com/en_US

CCM
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Re: Captain Scarlet's next bike

Bold… James Bold!

Not so pretty as a Softail Deluxe, though: and very futuristic for the '60's or 70's.
Makes me feel old, especially as it's a Harley..
I think it has not much to do with the bike experience - as we are use with.
It's more George Lucas's Star Wars 3rd series.

Wonder if they will decline it into RK, Electra, Softail, etc. (An Electric Electra Electro Glide, how would that be?…)

Captain Scarlet
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Although it seems laughable that the Hognescenti would warm to an Electric-Electra (did you see what I did there?), in some ways it might be an easier transition that people might think!

The V-Rod is a pretty decent motorcycle that is aging well. It's Porsche designed engine is bullet proof, 110 hp is ample for a cruiser and liquid cooling has its advantages in terms of reliability, noise emmisions and reduced rider plums roasting. But it's not popular with the great H.O.G. hoards. This is because it is perceived to be a 'Japanese Harley' - almost a Japanese copy of the 'real thang'.

But, an eBobber in Livewire mold, is a clean sheet design, that doesn't appear to be copying any of the early adopters like Brammus and others keen to make affordable machines aimed more at the green conscious commuter than 'knuckles in the wind' warriors. And as such, the clone-club stigma is largely removed.

Big, long and heavy bikes might also provide plenty of room for batteries. And the more batteries, the greater the power and range. Of course the greater the weight too - but this is off-set far better than when comparing heavy chrome and billet chunks of Harley iron, versus a carbon-giblets nipper-replica resplendent with tuned V4-stroker engine and spannies.

And of course cruiser/bagger/tourers need torque. Lots of low down torque. And producing maximum torque at zero revs isn't a bad starting argument for electric. But like air-cooled v-twins electric bikes soon run out of repeatable puff (HP), but it's not like the twin cam HD mill is a rev-monster anyway. Maybe if an electric Harley tourer could be made which offered 50% more torque, 80% lower running costs, a 300 mile range and proven reliability - over the air-cooled bikes - it might create an eventual migration, or even a mass-exodis?

Two things about the Livewire R&D bike that stuck out to me. Firstly I thought it sounded fantastic - like a small jet engine. I've never thought any electric bike sounded good, but some at the TT this year and this one really do. And secondly, how they have cleverly disguised the batteries and bodywork to looks like an engine. It's not left a visually-challenged step to overcome from a potential owners perspective.

If the dashboard didn't come on to the 'do-do-do-do-do' sound of the Close Encounters communication organ (ok... I might have made that last bit up!) then many riders themselves may not have realised that it's a Harley. And they'd be shocked (sic) when it shoots off without impedance(sic) into the distance.

If the number of Nissan Leaf's hogging the office car park are anything to go by, I'd say they're moving in the right direction if their strategy is to (largely) by-pass liquid cooling on the gas driven steeds altogether, in favor of jumping both feet first into the plug-n-play cruiser market - it would certainly take other manufacturers a while to catch up with them. And by then they'd have the cruiser market cornered. Again...

CCM
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Re: Captain Scarlet's next bike

I think people will buy an electric Harley - as long it will look as a Harley… feel and behave like one!
The sound shouldn't be a problem - my daughter plays a digital Yamaha piano, and it sounds pretty much like the real thing… and its price is only a small fraction from a Harley's.
Just remember the in-cabin artificial engine sound of late BMW's M5 and M3, and we'll get an approximative idea about what the future could look like.

Captain Scarlet
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A friend of mine has a grand piano and in his personal opinion he feels Yamaha keyboards and piano's are better than anything anybody is offering including Steinway!

Anyway, I agree with you. Harley claim the LiveWire is a prototype, but the volume they've produced and the fact they've announced a dealer roadshow around the country to gauge feedback suggests that it'll probably go into production with minimal changes, just incorporating that latest battery tech and tweaks at whatever the time of the launch is.

Here's about ten already seen riding around NYC at the dealer launch - laughable MCN claim they rode it as a 'world scoop' but it seems clear they probably rocked up at the dealers and left their drivers license to ride it, just like the rest of us mongrels - ha! :-D

YouTube: Harley-Davidson Livewire on the streets of New York

pittsy
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CS wrote: "And they'd be shocked (sic) when it shoots off without impedance(sic) into the distance."

Let's not forget that they're not immune to the effects of inertia, aero drag and rolling resistance.

I've seen some cars which have "zero emissions" emblazoned on the front and rear. Ok, provide an electrical charge and the vehicle will propel you forwards with arguably zero emissions. But it casually over looks the fact of how much/what kind of emissions have been excreted in producing the electricity in the first place.

And moving the electricity from A to B, over vast distances sometimes. Would you feel entirely at ease living directly under a pylon? Or next to a substation?

Anyway, I'd argue that nothing is free, so the car itself will produce emissions of some kind.

I'm not arguing against these contraptions, just for honesty and realism. Putting "zero emmisions" on the front is deception, in my eyes.

shuggiemac
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I am in entire agreement with Pittsy on this. Think also of all the energy that is used to produce the batteries, the elements dug out the earth for them and shipped around the world etc etc.

I am far from convinced about electric vehicles of any type at this moment in time. How long will the batteries actually have a working life, how much does it cost to replace them, what happens to them when they are used up etc etc?

I was reading a review on the electric BMW scooter that states it has a range of about 60 miles and a full charge costs about two quid. OK that is cheaper than petrol but not exactly earth shatteringly brilliant. People say that the bike can be charged at work and at home, so full of pep for the commute. I am sure companies will be thrilled at employees using their electricity for this purpose.

I am all for new things and open minded but today's electric bikes and cars are not the answer yet. Talk to me when they have a working range of 600+ miles and a 1 hour re-charge time, so I can use it for decent length trips in a real practical way. Till then they are as much use as a paper boat. I personally am much more interested in hydrogen as a fuel source for mobility purposes.

Captain Scarlet
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I've mentioned earlier (in this thread I think) that IMPO hydrogen is the way forward, because it is the largest natural abundance in our known universe and it produces nothing more harmful than water vapour.

This is no longer new, in that Honda has used it's hydrogen protype cars for donkeys years in California and Suzuki even had a hydrogen scooter. I think Kev even rode it once! H

owever, like every 'solution' it has its drawbacks. You need a power station the size of a decent shed sat at home on which to extract and import (generate) the hydrogen necessary.

Oh yeah, domestic power station runs on 'dirty' electricity imported from Russia btw! ;-D

And it's other major floor is that unless you have a kyptonite volt, eventually pure hydrogen will leak through any container that you can care to mention.

Fill up time is very slow compared with petrol, but is quick compared with electricity. Generation time is probably similar.

I always think the term 'zero emissions' is an oxymoron too - but to be fair to HD (and myself I suppose), there's been no claims of EV's being ZE vehicles.

And again, I think I've comprehensively covered this earlier in the thread and in other threads, that whilst electricity production detroys natural resources and is harmfulto the environment to produce, modern nuclear power stations are very highly efficient in the ways in which they generate that power, harness it and control it's emmissions. Few power sources are produced as cleanly, even if the process will never be ZE.

I think most people are with the program and on the same page when it comes to electricity not being as green as it is painted, but equally it's not as black either - put it this way, it is greener than petrol production, is less harmful to the environment both in production and watse products and just happens to be cost effective to the end user too. No bad thing.

One thing people do overlook - is that they almost begin to convince themselves that electricity is 'free' and of course it's not - and more demand will only push prices up!

I don't know about living under pylons, but if it's anything like telephone masts, then the very safest place for you to be is right under it. And that's a fact. It's the wider horizontal areas that are more dangerous. I've seen the hard R&D data at telecomms firms supporting that fact that your more at health risk living a reasonable distance from one, than having it right on your doorstep. Your TV also gives off far more radiation than your cell phone too, but everyone is worried about the long term affects of using a cell phone - that's fear, uncertainty and doubt for you.

It always makes me laugh when people talk about 6-700 ranges and one hour charges. When the reality is. Their present vehicles don't have anywhere near that sort of range. And they rarely travel more than a fifty mile round trip on any given day. And rarely have days when their vehicle isn't sat in their garage doing Jack for 12 hours straight. Come on fellas, put your hands up at the back if I am wrong about that? Even a Brammus lecky bike wouldn't break a sweat doing that - never mind a Nissan Leaf, Chevy Volt or a horrid Prius thingamy!

But what if I want to drive to Vegas? - they say. Well you've never driven there before so why start now I say? Yes... very well, but what if I want to - huh, huh, huh? I say, with the money you're saving in fuel economy and reduced maintenance costs, fly business class and let the plane take the strain.

So would I buy one? Nah, they're shit! :-D

pittsy
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Re: Captain Scarlet's next bike

Fair play with that reply cap'n.

Although what you're telling me about radiation from pylons, if applicable to electricity ones, isn't making me feel any better! ;D

Captain Scarlet
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I was always told that a 'short, sharp, shock' was good for me! :-D

minkeyspankerworkly seem to think it shiftess faster than your old fashioned gas-powered machine in the urban environment:

'It feels fast, and there's absolutely no question that it'll have the measure of any conventionally powered motorcycle in urban use'.

... note the use of the key word 'any'. Me thinks they've never run the traffic light GP with Mista Scarlet on the latest and great S1000RR or the Diavel Carbon Red :-D

Looks fun though, I'd like to ride it!

shuggiemac
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Cap'n good to 'chat' again after a good while.

I am in full agreement regarding nuclear. It is the way forward and with me being so close to Germany, I could be shot for saying such a thing !!!!!

I will take issue with you regarding the points you make of decent range of electric vehicles today. The fact is that I, just as an example, regularly make 800 mile plus journeys in the family car. We drive for family holidays for example. Weekend trips to Austria, Slovenia etc. I am going back home to Scotland this weekend with my two kids and drive to the ferry in Holland, over night sur la mer and then drive up to my parents. Simply could not be done in an electric car right now. Motorcycle trips of any length at all are out the question with what we have today, especially a camping weekend away as a good example. I agree that a lot of journeys are short but I would also wager that a significant amount are not. Flying business class to Las Vegas is a great sound bite statement but it wouldn't half make for a crapola road trip holiday. So we shall have to agree to disagree that the comment of at least six hundred mile range and a one hour recharge time is not laughable. The bottom line is that todays electric vehicles are expensive and as a single vehicle for Joe Average, his wife, two point three kids and the black Labrador called Prince not a truly practical solution.

I look forward to the day when they will be, however.

Captain Scarlet
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I don't think EV vehicles are the solution for people like yourself who regular travel vast miles. But you already know that. And equally you already know that you are in a vast minority in that.

I think that the only vehicle I can think of that has a range greater than 600 miles is a Jeep Cherokee with a Fiat 3.0 V6 turbo-diesel mill in it (they claim nearer 700 with a fairy-light foot) - I think they're only sold in north America and is a new model for this year.

I myself commute 12.5 miles each way. And I very rarely travel more than 50 miles on a Saturday or Sunday. I only travel about 10,000 miles a year, which is probably 2-5k less than the average person. But what I do know is, my average is a lot closer to most nations average than yours is.

And so, there is a large populous of people who only travel in a tin box about as far as I do or slightly more each year. Importantly they too probably have 5 shortish (20-40 mile round trips) Mon-Fri and and rarely need to go further than a hundred miles in one journey at weekends.

And for those people a 2014 Nissan Leaf - which can now manage a genuine 100 miles with the air-con and audio on, whilst being used briskly; and can also be re-charged twice as quickly - is perfectly adequate.

More over, Joe Average 'can' afford to buy them in America because they are 'cheap to buy' brand new here: $21k or around 14k GBP after government rebate.

Of course Joe Average might not want one, no matter how short his commute or how green his credentials, but that's the beauty of choice.

Another key point to remember is that the technology is advancing at a significantly faster pace than that of the humble combustion engine. For instance the CHAdeMO chargers which have already begin rollout all typically re-charge an EV to 80% capacity in less than 30 minutes.

Still not as convenient as a petrol station, but for a lot of people with say a 200 mile round weekend trip to do, it means they can typically recharge it at or near their destination - perhaps a family members house, at Starbucks or totally free at a Wallgreens grocery store as they do here. And a cuppa, or grocery shop, or a chin wage with a sibling will usually kill 45-60 minutes in the blink of an eye, in which case you'd have a full tank of lecky again.

As I mention, EVs aren't and won't be for everyone, and perhaps their primary advantage is in the urban jungle for urban commuting. Or as second vehicles, to a gas vehicle. Or utilized as an EV that has a gas range extender such as the BMW i3 and Chevy Volt for instance which can totally remove range anxiety for the vast majority of people.

I remember back in about 1983, showing a friend a little shiny disc, which fitted into a little Philips made box. It played music though my hi-fi amplifier - by Jean Michel Jarre to be exact. I told him it would replace vinyl records quicker than he thought. He told me it would never catch on. I told him that probably by the end of the century we wouldn't even need records or CD's, all music would probably be stored on digital computer files. He looked at me like I was insane. I own over 10,000 songs. But I don't have a record or CD player.

Anyway, likewise good to hear from you Shuggs - me old mucka. EV might not be for you, but it will be for many - even the Hognescenti get it: http://youtu.be/m2D2in_AP_8

pittsy
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CS said: "I don't know about living under pylons, but if it's anything like telephone masts, then the very safest place for you to be is right under it. And that's a fact."

Ah, I'm seeing what you did there. The safest place to be re EV bikes is on the saddle!

Ker Ching. Another one sold boss. ;)

Mind you, the safest place to be re those smelly, polluting ICE bikes is also on the saddle. But, best to do about 90 mph (or whatever your local speed limit kids) thereby leaving the nasty stuff well behind for passers by to inhale.

Getting back to -you'll drag me kicking and screaming, grumpy old geeza-mode. These 'ere batteries then. So the distance you can travel on a charge. That will remain consistent throughout the life of the car? If it's anything like my power tool batteries it won't! You'll be down to half distance midway through the battery's life.

Navy Boy
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Re: Captain Scarlet's next bike

I suspect that the biggest obstacle to EV sales here in the UK will come down to 2 main factors. Range and the availability of suitable charging points.

I read an interesting article in this week's Autocar about Tesla's plans to enter the UK market. They're promising full charger coverage for the UK by the end of 2015. Or at the very least chargers sufficiently available to allow their cars to reach the extremities of the UK mainland.

We'll see how that pans out however I suspect that there'll be many interested observers seeing how their plans progress.

As for EV bikes - I can't wait to ride one.

Captain Scarlet
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Tesla are good (one stormed passed my Porsche the other day and I genuinely had trouble keeping up) but they are costly, so will probably never become mainstream.

BMW's EV scooter is a looker and people like Zero and Brammus are increasingly making lighter and better looking bikes, that go faster and further, whilst costing the same or less. I.e. Progressing along nicely.

I think one of the biggest signs of improvement has come from the Lecky TT Racers. When they started about three years ago (or whenever) it seemed like 90% of them trundled around at 50 mph until they run out of juice before even completing a lap. Now the majority seem to be finishing the three (?) laps they do and I think (?) are averaging about 99 mph. Most of the teams seemed to be saying that they expect significant improvements next year as a new gen of batteries is about to come out. Whatever works...

I've heard the Livewire proto range is very poor. About 50 miles when hammered. That's not very good, but arguably it's in early stages of development. The speed and emotion seems to be very acceptable. Electric bikes are very smooth of course, so may be received as bland by experienced riders such as ourselves - we'll just have to eventually ride one to see.

One thing that should benefit us ('collective bikers') is the fact that they are twist-and-go. In theory this makes them accessible to anyone who has a car license by default, and also makes them less intimidating to newbies that worry about handling a clutch and gearbox. As the car world becomes more dual-clutch auto centric, it seems a logical transition for bikes, albeit wtih some artificial steps as per manual mode on a VFR12 auto for instance, to keep the experienced happier.

Either way, I'm looking forward to trying an EV and I personally think that by 2020 they'll be genuine viable alternatives to mainstream machines and will probably represent 30% of manufacturers ranges by then?

kharli
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Re: Captain Scarlet's next bike

I would love to think I could retro fit my nc with a leccy motor and micro fusion power cell when petrol's made illegal..or earlier ! If they can get cheaper better catalysts gas powered fuel cells are creeping along in development as a power source.
I wonder what the range would be with flow battery tech where you just change the electrolyte at a `filling` station ?

Captain Scarlet
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Interesting thoughts Kharli.

I notice that today Tesla announced that it is going to make all of its R&D lessons learned and technology available to anyone in the car industry, to benefit and speed up the development of electric cars. That could have quite a profound effect on many manufacturers development.

I believe Telsa are also in talks with Mercedes to provide electric power plants for them moving forwards too. Perhaps Tesla's gambit is that if take-up is increased, then they are ideally positioned as a long term provider to sign partnership agreements with major players, in the same way that say Cummins engines are sold to truck manufacturers or Rotax power plants are sold to motorcycle, ATV and snowmobile manufacturers.

Both re-charging speed and range are improving in regular iterations from all manufacturers it seems. And companies like Mugen (I think that's run by the son of Mr. Honda?) seem to be making major leaps on a monthly basis, never mind annual. For anyone who thinks electric bikes will probably be slow and could never be sporty, this might reset your exceptions of what might be available to us on the road later this decade: http://youtu.be/vlxZs2-gICc

CCM
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Great video!
It sounds more like a jet engine! apparently, looks as very fast, too: frightening fast, actually

unconventional rebel
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OK, I think if you ride for the adrenaline, then a lecky bike could well be an answer, if it'll do a days ride fast, smooth and cheap then fine.

Commuters, fine too, range not an issue and just charge it up at night, as long as it's cheap and easy to ride.

Tourers, well, a 700 mile range before being plugged into the motel overnight, could work for all except the trans africa mob.

Cruisers, as long it looks good and sounds good, no problem.

I'm not convinced meself regarding batteries, good point about the reality of rechargables getting erratic after a while, and so far they all have a limited life and are are extremely expensive to replace. That will probably change - but I'll wait and see on reality over manufacturers claims, call me cynical.....

So will I chop in the Bullet for one? Nah... I love tickling the carb, easing it over tdc, the gentle thud and shake as you swing it through the country lanes, the need to plan and balance every gear shift. The smell of hot oil and ping of a cooling engine. Riding is not about efficiency, or economy, never has been.

shuggiemac
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Captain you have been in the colonies way too long :-) There are tons of vehicles with a range greater than 600 miles. I am back home in Scotland with my kids just now and drove from Prague to Amsterdam and the a further 100km on the UK side after the ferry before needing to think about filling up the car which is just a humble new SEAT Alhambra family bus.

I am all for electric vehicles and I am very aware of their sporting capabilities. I stand by my position that right now they are not a widely viable option. If you have the disposable income to have a novelty car or bike for city commuting, short runs, or posing about then great. As a one only option then they are not there yet, not by a long chalk. The technology is coming on leaps and bounds and changes as you say nearly monthly. Until such time as it reaches a truly useable level and does not reach almost instant obsolescence then I'll waste my money on my kids methinks.

Captain Scarlet
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"Riding is not about efficiency, or economy, never has been"
... I wouldn't argue against that point of view. Although an S1000RR HP4 or NC700X owner may well do! :-D

"Captain you have been in the colonies way too long :-) "
... no doubt. We aim to apply for (dual) citizenship soon. 'Oh, say can you see, y'all...'

"There are tons of vehicles with a range greater than 600 miles"
... maybe. Absolutely critical for most people? I think not. My Porsche won't do half that. My bikes generally won't do half what the Porsche can do. Criteria, it's a personal thang...

"I stand by my position that right now they are not a widely viable option"
... I completely agree. You'll note that I never said otherwise - just acknowledged that I didn't know of any production vehicles bar one that had a range in excess of 700 miles and generalizing didn't think that was essential to the masses.

"As a one only option then they are not there yet, not by a long chalk"
... the latest Brammus thingamy (good looking steed, with six speed box - for real) uses the same fast-charger as the Leaf/Volt etc, and claims 100 mile range. Jay Leno took one on his Channel over 100 mph. Not sure of the re-charge time (not an issue for many urban commuters I'm sure), but 100 mph for 100 miles doesn't sound too far away, does it? Certainly not by 'a long chalk' - no offense intended.

Don't get me wrong, I wouldn't be an early adopter just yet myself either. They don't currently suit my needs. But 100 mph for 150 miles and a 2 hour charge time might soon become a reality. And then they'll be an upsurge for both urban commuters and Livewire style local cruiser posers.It's not going to replace a Road King just yet...

A quick YouTube surf amazed me at just how many people have made (quite fast and not bad looking) DIY electric motorcycles and commute by them. I was quite shocked(ha) to see that in actual fact.

"Until such time as it reaches a truly useable level and does not reach almost instant obsolescence"
... the latter is going to be a good point. When I were a nipper I used to flog high-end hi-fi's. When customers asked why it cost so much, I'd always reply 'That's the cost of owning tomorrows technology today sir' - which often got strange looks from the lady I'd be speaking to.

But I digress. The sweet spot will be as per smart phones now. Well developed, reliable and cheap, with little progression being made. You'd be gutted if you paid ten grand for a bike that took ten hours to charge, went 100 mph for 100 miles. And then three months later they released v2.0 that re-charged in an hour, cost five grand and went 150 mph for 200 miles. Why, it'd be just like buying a top-line Ducati R and then buy Christmas the base model punts out more power and wears nicer components, ha! :-D

pittsy
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Re: Captain Scarlet's next bike

Apparently the lithium used in li-ion batteries is highly reactive and has an incredibly high energy density.

WELL CHUCK IT STRAIGHT DOWN THE INLET VALVE THEN! ! !

Lol.

Bottom line. If we all rode a honda cb250rs and drove a suzuki alto, then the problem wouldn't really be such a problem anymore.

If you have more kids than can be squeezed into a suzuki alto then you're not putting your condom on properly. Plus, you must have too much money and should be forced by law to give some of it away to those who have less.

Simples.