HONDA NC700X

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gunshot72
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Re: HONDA NC700X

Hi all. I test rode the NC700X today. To give you some background I have owned a DRZ400SM, Tiger 1050, ZZR1400, 2006 Blade, 2010 Blade ABS, Street Triple R (still have this) and 2003 CBR600F.

I've gradually moved away from the massively powerful bikes over the past few years for many reasons. One is I never ever found the opportunity on our roads to really use the top 40% of the power output of the fastest bikes I owned. Secondly, as I use my bikes 80% of the time for commuting, fuel economy and not how fast I could get to work became more important. I'm kind of lucky that I have a Street Triple R, because that is my track and sunny weekend bike that I can thrash and accept 30 mpg.

However, my current commuter, a 2003 CBR600F, which I may add has been a great long distance tourer as well, is just too thirsty the way I ride it. I assumed when I bought it I would get 55 mpg but it's more like 38 mpg. With todays fuel prices that's just not good enough. Therefore, when the NC700X was announced I was keen to try.

One things for sure, if you cannot adapt your riding style you will suffer on this bike. If you cannot accept that the engine is different, you will never get on with it. Too many riders are one dimensional and will never change. it would take a massive sea change in the motorcycle market, over many years, to change how people ride.

The NC700X is heavy, but it feels as light as my Street Triple when moving. If you're a natural short-shifter you will adapt easy to the NC700X. Those who cannot shift below 8000 rpm will hate it. I found it very easy to adapt to this new engine. I only accidentally hit the rev limiter once on the test ride and then never again. It has decent low to mid range torque, easily enough to compete with any high revving 600. In fact I would put it's torque delivery at a safer level than my CBR600F because there is no lag when you are at a lower rpm like on the CBR. You just don't need to be nailing it to be prepared to overtake on the NC700X. The torque is there ready and waiting at 2000 rpm. So, if you keep changing low down in the revs you can obtain decent power and torque delivery for fast and safe overtakes. If you attempt it too high, like at 4500 rpm you'll run out of revs before the overtake is complete! :-(

Ergonomics are great. The riding position is very natural and one of the most comfortable I've ever experienced. Bars are nice and wide and the steering lock is impressive. Not so wide as a F800GS but still good. Certainly beats any sportbike!

Seat is good for 150 miles+. Storage compartment makes the bike have even more luggage capability than nearly anything else on the market once the top box and panniers are added but is just a great bonus to have somewhere to throw a days items rather than a tank bag. I would happily take this bike on a 1500 mile trip around Europe which I may end up doing in June for the Assen MotoGP.

Mirrors are very good also and vibe free through all of the rev range.

You can tell where the engine saves fuel. On my CBR600F 90 mph 6th gear is 7000 rpm. The same speed and gear on the NC700X is 4500rpm!

One downside is that 6th is very tall, so if you need a quick blast to get past something it takes some time to do it. However, I find this in most other bikes of that size engine in top gear so it's not an issue if you can plan!

Whoever said it's not that well made is talking crap. You can see straight away it's a Japanese built Honda. Switch gear is typical of Honda, very well placed and smooth to operate. The only areas I would say that look budget are the one piece gear and rear brake levers, the fuel cap (hidden anyway) and the bottom yoke. The seat covering is a bit slippy but that just makes rain bead and fall off easier!

Gearbox was outstandingly smooth for a bike with only 4 miles on it and neutral was easily found with a reassuring clunk at every stop.

Weather protection is a bit rubbish but this seems to be more a result from the 'non tank' being quite low, so rain literally comes under the screen and rolls down the 'non tank' into your groin area. If you do not have decent wet weather kit expect wet nuts! My Hein Gericke Master V is brilliant though.

I have had tall screens in the past and hate them. I've never understood why riders insist on having turbulence added to their bike. Too much buffeting all the time. I prefer to be hit by a clean direct wind as it keeps my head steady, improves vision and also clears rain easily. The NC700X is good for all that.

Would have preferred a 180 rear but then it wouldn't have handled as well and the 160 is cheaper to replace I guess.

There seems to be so many haters out there already for this bike, oddly from people who have never ridden it.

bdimon
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Re: HONDA NC700X USA Pricing Mistake

So Honda just announced that the NC700X will come to the USA in summer 2012 - exciting. It's priced from $6,999 (5,400 euros) - even more exciting! But that doesn't include ABS - what? You can only get ABS in a package with the DCT - for crying out loud! The ABS and DCT version costs $8,999 which is still good but I don't want an automatic transmission.

I don't know why Americans avoid ABS on our bikes. My next bike WILL have ABS because I ride when it rains and city roads have oily slick spots. This is why I won't consider Kawasaki's Versys which I cannot get with ABS. You Europeans can but we Americans cannot. (sigh)

I don't know if I want to adjust to a self-shifting motorcycle. I'll have to ride one next summer. Oh well, at least it will be available as an option. It's good to have choices.

gunshot72
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Re: HONDA NC700X USA Pricing Mistake

bdimon wrote:
So Honda just announced that the NC700X will come to the USA in summer 2012 - exciting. It's priced from $6,999 (5,400 euros) - even more exciting! But that doesn't include ABS - what? You can only get ABS in a package with the DCT - for crying out loud! The ABS and DCT version costs $8,999 which is still good but I don't want an automatic transmission.

I don't know why Americans avoid ABS on our bikes. My next bike WILL have ABS because I ride when it rains and city roads have oily slick spots. This is why I won't consider Kawasaki's Versys which I cannot get with ABS. You Europeans can but we Americans cannot. (sigh)

I don't know if I want to adjust to a self-shifting motorcycle. I'll have to ride one next summer. Oh well, at least it will be available as an option. It's good to have choices.

Erm, move to Europe?

alanp
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Re: HONDA NC700X USA Pricing Mistake

bdimon wrote:
So Honda just announced that the NC700X will come to the USA in summer 2012 - exciting. It's priced from $6,999 (5,400 euros) - even more exciting! But that doesn't include ABS - what? You can only get ABS in a package with the DCT - for crying out loud! The ABS and DCT version costs $8,999 which is still good but I don't want an automatic transmission.

I don't know why Americans avoid ABS on our bikes. My next bike WILL have ABS because I ride when it rains and city roads have oily slick spots. This is why I won't consider Kawasaki's Versys which I cannot get with ABS. You Europeans can but we Americans cannot. (sigh)

I don't know if I want to adjust to a self-shifting motorcycle. I'll have to ride one next summer. Oh well, at least it will be available as an option. It's good to have choices.


No, it doesn't make sense to me to only have ABS with the DCT. Makes you wonder who makes this sort of decision?

Rocker66
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Re: HONDA NC700X

gunshot72 wrote:

There seems to be so many haters out there already for this bike, oddly from people who have never ridden it.

This has been true of bikes that tend to be different for many years. way back in the '60s I was the first person in our cafe crowd to buy a Japenese bike which everybody mocked and said would never catch on. In '73 every body laughed when I bought a new GL1000 and told me that Goldwings would never catch on. even on this forum I was abused my one member for my choice of a VFR1200DCT. On another forum there is a guy that insults Harleys at every opportunity yet when asked which models he has ridden has to admit that the answer is none. I guess that there will always be a minority for whom anyone who has different taste to theirs must be wrong

gunshot72
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Re: HONDA NC700X

alanp wrote:
No, it doesn't make sense to me to only have ABS with the DCT. Makes you wonder who makes this sort of decision?

I agree it doesn't make sense not to have it on the manual model for the USA but I guess as you say perhaps Honda decided this because most USA riders are negative about ABS on manual bikes in general and therefore it would inhibit sales.

Rocker66 wrote:
This has been true of bikes that tend to be different for many years. way back in the '60s I was the first person in our cafe crowd to buy a Japenese bike which everybody mocked and said would never catch on. In '73 every body laughed when I bought a new GL1000 and told me that Goldwings would never catch on. even on this forum I was abused my one member for my choice of a VFR1200DCT. On another forum there is a guy that insults Harleys at every opportunity yet when asked which models he has ridden has to admit that the answer is none. I guess that there will always be a minority for whom anyone who has different taste to theirs must be wrong

I know what you mean. I'm getting those sort of reactions now when I tell my riding buddies I'm thinking of the NC700X as a commuter and tourer. Only one of them sees the bigger picture and agrees it looks like a great option for those two requirements. I'm not a HD fan myself but that's only down to what I prefer a bike to look like. I have never ridden one so would not comment either way on what they are like. I do frown at leather tassels on biker pants though!

bdimon
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Re: HONDA NC700X

Rocker66 wrote:
even on this forum I was abused my one member for my choice of a VFR1200DCT.

So do you think the DCT is a good choice for the NC700X? Is there a DCT thread? I use the friction zone all the time and wonder about fine control at low speed using only the throttle.

Rocker66
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Re: HONDA NC700X

bdimon wrote:

So do you think the DCT is a good choice for the NC700X? Is there a DCT thread? I use the friction zone all the time and wonder about fine control at low speed using only the throttle.

I enjoyed the DCT on my VFR. Having said that as I would be using the NC as an all year round commuter I think that I would go for the manual version for extra control in bad weather conditions. Of course there is the added bonus of the fact that it's CHEAPER!! :)

Rocker66
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Re: HONDA NC700X

gunshot72 wrote:
I know what you mean. I'm getting those sort of reactions now when I tell my riding buddies I'm thinking of the NC700X as a commuter and tourer. Only one of them sees the bigger picture and agrees it looks like a great option for those two requirements. I'm not a HD fan myself but that's only down to what I prefer a bike to look like. I have never ridden one so would not comment either way on what they are like. I do frown at leather tassels on biker pants though!

I have had the same thing in that some people don't realise that some of us use our bikes as serious transport and not just for fun. The NC would be my everyday transport the way my deauville is now anf when I want to go riding just for pleasure I get the Crossrunner out of the garage

Captain Scarlet
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Re: HONDA NC700X

"It's priced from $6,999 (5,400 euros) - even more exciting! But that doesn't include ABS - what? You can only get ABS in a package with the DCT - for crying out loud! The ABS and DCT version costs $8,999"
... On face value that's a natural conclusion when you look at the summary on the web site. But Honda America have long had one of the worst web sites I've ever seen in my life and I wouldn't assume, based on the information shown, that you won't be able to get an ABS/manual gearbox combo.

I remember reading somewhere that 'every' BMW coming into America from 2012 inclusive onwards will be fitted with ABS as 'standard' equipment? If true, American's can't be that adversed to the emergency benefits of the system it seems....

I think the NC700X could suit a multitude of riders for varied reasons and uses. It's interest demographic is probably wider than many experienced riders might appreciate I think.

It interests me because they've made the engine more car/Harley like. I.e. It's a low revving engine, with smooth delivery, decent torque and high fuel economy. Doesn't look too tall, heavy or ugly either. Plus being a Honda you know it's very likely to be bullet-proof. It's a good potential option for my wife, as it's less intimidating size and power wise than many other bikes, that interest her, to help her gain some newbie riding confidence.

gunshot72
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Re: HONDA NC700X

Rocker66 wrote:
I have had the same thing in that some people don't realise that some of us use our bikes as serious transport and not just for fun. The NC would be my everyday transport the way my deauville is now anf when I want to go riding just for pleasure I get the Crossrunner out of the garage

Looks like it may just be me and you buying the NC so far then mate!

What I found surprising the other day was when I went into a Honda dealer to have a look at the NC and the salesman was very negative about it. I asked him what it was like and he basically shook his head and said not very good. I looked at him as he told me I really wanted a Deauville. I said it's not my sort of bike and I already told him I need a commuter for 40 miles a day, not a full on long distance bike. He said he gets over 70 mpg out of his Deauville which frankly is utter BS. I imagine he's one of these types that cannot alter his riding style to suit different types of bike, so he assumed I was the same. I told him I've done track, race, road, enduro, MX and touring and I can ride almost anything with some mental adjustment! I won't be going there to buy one. Bloody dinosaur! I should have said his attitude will not sell many bikes and that with George White going under this week no one is safe from the administrators. Honda I'm sure are after their own branches and are slowly culling their dealer network.

gunshot72
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Re: HONDA NC700X

Captain Scarlet wrote:
Doesn't look too tall, heavy or ugly either. Plus being a Honda you know it's very likely to be bullet-proof. It's a good potential option for my wife, as it's less intimidating size and power wise than many other bikes, that interest her, to help her gain some newbie riding confidence.

Actually it is a bit tall. I'm 5'10" with a 31" inside leg and it was just right for me as I like my heels to be just off the ground when the bike is bolt upright. Doesn't seem to be anywhere to adjust overall height either. And it is actually a heavy bike but you cannot tell with all the weight down low.

gunshot72
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Re: HONDA NC700X

kevash wrote:
I think my 64mpg is likely to be the lowest you'd get and most riders will be closer to 70mpg, but even 64mpg is a 200 mile range, that's perfectly acceptable I reckon, you'd only be looking to refuel from 170 miles. It's more than the VFR!

Hi Kev. May I ask how you calculated 64 mpg given the bike does not give out any instant or average mpg data on it's dash? Was it a case of filling up with the max 14 litres and running it until dry then doing some sums?

Rocker66
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Re: HONDA NC700X

gunshot72 wrote:
Hi Kev. May I ask how you calculated 64 mpg given the bike does not give out any instant or average mpg data on it's dash? Was it a case of filling up with the max 14 litres and running it until dry then doing some sums?

I don't know about Kev but I work out my MPG by resetting the tripmeter every time I fill up and noting the mileage and fuel used. To get an average figure my wife has set me up with a spread sheet which works this figure out more accuretly than my mental maths.
as to the fuel consumption on the Deauville I don't know how the salesman uses his but on my daily commute which is around 75 mile round trip including 2 towns motorway & A roads mine averages circa 55MPG.

Rocker66
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Re: HONDA NC700X

[quote=gunshot72] Looks like it may just be me and you buying the NC so far then mate!

quote]

I haven't decided whether to buy yet as I'm waiting on my test ride on the 25TH but if I do that will 3 of us as Panrider has ordered one

Captain Scarlet
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Re: HONDA NC700X

Tall AND Heavy then! Imagine what mpg it would have done if it had been light then? :-D

MP1300GT
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Re: HONDA NC700X

I'm probably not the best person to judge a Bike's weight, after riding an Ultraglide and K1300Gt over the past 7 years, but after sitting on the NX700X, it didn't feel heavy at ALL. In addition, its riding position felt absolutely perfect.

Yes, it could/should have been lighter but I really don't think it will be an issue. Just my 2 cents...

IrlMike
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Re: HONDA NC700X

I think in my earlier post I was quite critical of it.

And as an all round, sole bike, I still don't think it stands up. That is, for someone who wants commuting plus weekend/touring fun, I don't think the extra fuel economy really makes up for poor performance in other areas, particularly suspension. It looked very dodgy to me in that video, & that was on a good surface.

Put this engine in a lighter 'proper' chassis, with better suspension etc., give it 10hp more (retaining good low rpm torque), sacrifice 5mpg, and the story changes. Yes the price would go up, but could still be competitive with other mid size offerings.

However, as a budget commuter, for those with another 'fun' bike, Honda do have something here. But I don't think it's the bike version of this platform. If its purpose is a daily commuter, capable & economical over a distance, including some m'way miles, then it looks good. But it would make far more sense imo to buy the scooter version & get the weather protection the bike lacks.

gunshot72
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Re: HONDA NC700X

IrlMike, I guess it would be true if it was just a commuter but surely a scooter would be rubbish in terms of luggage for a tour. I'm sure a very small amount of people would take their super scooters on a tour and each to their own I guess, but the NC allows for more luggage capability and perhaps a little bit more in terms of handling over a super scooter. Don't get me wrong, it isn't anywhere near as fun as all my previous bikes but I would get one solely for the commute and one or two 1000 mile tours a year. If I want outright hilarity I'd get a different bike.

Rocker66
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Re: HONDA NC700X

The integra or as you describe it the scooter (how I hate typing that word) version only comes in the DCT version and having had a bike with DCT for all weather use I would prefer a manual. The Integra also cost a lot more than the X. for Integra money I might as well buy another deauville which at least could NEVER be classified as a scooter

gunshot72
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Re: HONDA NC700X

vroum_ninou wrote:
CBRs are great bikes... but they are not the most exciting superbikes. RSV4? 1198? Panigale? RC8R? S1000RR? ZX10R?
May be the best sportbike for the road but as a pure sportbike it's not the most inspiring.
....This is typical of the mindset of so called real bike riders. What sports bikes do you know of not made for a road then? I can tell you the Blade is totally inspiring if you can ride it well.

I've read all your posts on this subject and I still have no idea what you are talking about. Can you please define 'real' bike? Can you also tell me how you score all those 1000cc sports bikes above the Blade and if you have ridden them all in order to judge? You just seem to be quoting every MCN issue from the past 20 years.

I have tested all of those 1000cc sports bikes and I chose the Blade over all of them, twice! If you're interested I'll tell you why I did, but I'll give you real reasons rather than just the same canned response to every new idea that hits our declining market. RSV4 too small and useless ergonomics, mirrors and clutch. ZX10R too revvy, tips far too quickly, rubbish suspension, good motor but useless low to mid torque delivery. 1098 shakes itself to pieces, too steep a seat angle, aching wrists after 5 minutes, too expensive. Panigale, dunno but likely the same as the 1098. RC8R lovely bike but too expensive, nice ergonomics and adaptability, brilliant torque delivery but whole bike too vibey. S1000RR closest to the Blade in terms of everything but unusable amounts of power and over blown with never needed tech, also too expensive. For real world riding the Blade was the best, even though ALL of these bikes are entirely impractical and overpowered - for the road! but that is what we are talking about right?

IrlMike
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Re: HONDA NC700X

gunshot72

Yes, I guess the bike would have the edge as regards luggage. But, and assuming you're touring solo, why would you not use one of your other bikes for that? Just my take on things, but I'm thinking you would want (as you own such) a more pacey bike when you've arrived at likely some enjoyable area of twisties? I share your views on the 1 litre sports bikes, so not suggesting that level speed/ability is needed, but I can't help thinking the wobble & weave of the NC700 (judging by the video only, admittedly) would be a bit unsatisfying even at a low/mid pace? I've never been a Cruiser fan, tho', so you can see where my preferences are biased.

If the alternative for fun/touring is a fireblade, good as it is, I can understand that it's just too powerful & often needing some throttle restraint that creates its own unwanted distraction.

It's a bit of a hobby horse of mine that there aren't many 80 to 100hp bikes with +both+ relaxed torquey engines (driveability & fuel economy) & high quality suspension/chassis. To me, this seems the optimum choice for places like the Alps, Dolomites or Pyrenees, including the 'D' road run to get there. Good enough imo (& experience) to run at the pace most sportbike riders are capable of, but more comfortable at a touring pace. The 47hp of the NC, combined with its wide spread of torque, wouldn't be a deal breaker, but the suspension definitely would be in this context. I'm not sure I like the linked brake set up either.

As Rocker66 says, the term 'scooter' seems not a fair description for an NC based Integra, or some other 'maxi' offerings too. Notwithstanding my feelings about their suspension compared to bikes, they seem much more capable than scooters of old & firmly into the realm of bike performance.

The big plus over a Deaville is surely the fuel economy, and I'm assuming the DCT has a manual gearchange option at the handlebar? I think I'd find that quite good for a pure commuter.

vroum_ninou
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Re: HONDA NC700X

Well... What can I say... You've got me all figured out...

I've got no idea what I'm talking about and I can't ride, let alone ride well. I just can read MCN.

I'm so happy you got to this forum to set everybody straight HondaLover72! I feel so unworthy...

gunshot72
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Re: HONDA NC700X

Odd reaction v_m. I just said I didn't understand you and I still don't. You said the Blade was uninspiring. Why and how? You said Hondas are dull, your opinion of course but it's just a statement with no further words. Frankly I've forgotten what junk you came up with about the NC, ah yes, the weight thing which of course means it will handle like a dog. Even when you've already read from KevAsh and others that the weight makes no difference to it's handling.

By the way I have a Triumph and a Honda currently and have had Suzuki, Kwak, BMW and more Hondas and Triumphs in the past so not really HondaLover72 as you so cleverly came up with! Whereas you own 3 KTM's, so whose the fanboy!

gunshot72
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Re: HONDA NC700X

IrlMike wrote:
gunshot72

Yes, I guess the bike would have the edge as regards luggage. But, and assuming you're touring solo, why would you not use one of your other bikes for that? Just my take on things, but I'm thinking you would want (as you own such) a more pacey bike when you've arrived at likely some enjoyable area of twisties? I share your views on the 1 litre sports bikes, so not suggesting that level speed/ability is needed, but I can't help thinking the wobble & weave of the NC700 (judging by the video only, admittedly) would be a bit unsatisfying even at a low/mid pace? I've never been a Cruiser fan, tho', so you can see where my preferences are biased.

If the alternative for fun/touring is a fireblade, good as it is, I can understand that it's just too powerful & often needing some throttle restraint that creates its own unwanted distraction.

It's a bit of a hobby horse of mine that there aren't many 80 to 100hp bikes with +both+ relaxed torquey engines (driveability & fuel economy) & high quality suspension/chassis. To me, this seems the optimum choice for places like the Alps, Dolomites or Pyrenees, including the 'D' road run to get there. Good enough imo (& experience) to run at the pace most sportbike riders are capable of, but more comfortable at a touring pace. The 47hp of the NC, combined with its wide spread of torque, wouldn't be a deal breaker, but the suspension definitely would be in this context. I'm not sure I like the linked brake set up either.

As Rocker66 says, the term 'scooter' seems not a fair description for an NC based Integra, or some other 'maxi' offerings too. Notwithstanding my feelings about their suspension compared to bikes, they seem much more capable than scooters of old & firmly into the realm of bike performance.

The big plus over a Deaville is surely the fuel economy, and I'm assuming the DCT has a manual gearchange option at the handlebar? I think I'd find that quite good for a pure commuter.

You could well be right about the suspension long term as it didn't look top drawer. But that's just looks of course. I've always found Hondas to have marginally better stock suspension out of the factory than most other bikes I've ridden. I rode the NC on the A1 Southbound for over 20 miles at 90 mph in awful weather. It was plush and feels bigger than it is. I'd imagine all that weight low down is helping to create a quite planted feel. It certainly felt in the 50 miles I did (40 miles of which were tanking it on a motorway) it would cope with fast cruising on a tour. I agree with you it may be a bit different when the twisties arrive but I'd need another try to tell. I may be unique in that when I tour I take lots of kit including camping gear and knee down twisty mayhem is not a priority! Street Triple R for that when I get back, LOL.

vroum_ninou
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Re: HONDA NC700X

gunshot72 wrote:
Odd reaction v_m. I just said I didn't understand you and I still don't.

No you did not just say that, may be you should reread your post. Then may be my answer won't seem that odd.

If you have, as you pretend, read all my posts on the subject, then you should have a good idea what my thoughts are on the subject as I was quite clear. If not, well, sorry, I don't think I can state it more clearly.

Will the NC handle like a dog. I'm pretty sure it won't. Would it handle better if it was 50kg lighter? I'm pretty sure it would!
But hey, who am I am to pretend that all things equal a lighter bike handles better than a heavier bike?
If you say that a 180 kg NC would not handle better than a 230 kg NC, or have a better mpg, then I'll have to take your word for it I guess... After all, what do I know?

And again, you have me all figured out on the fanboyism... Obviously you have indeed read all my posts on this subject... I have only had KTMs, all my life!
And when I was looking for a new sportbike I was not torn between an S1000RR an RSV4 and an RC8R... not at all!
And when I was looking for a supermotard I was not looking for a CRF 450! You would not catch me dead doing this!

IrlMike
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Re: HONDA NC700X

I've test ridden an STR and it deserves all the accolades it gets imho. Of course there'd be a bit of fuel cost accompanying the fun on a long tour as well. But yes, it's such a light bike that packing it with camping gear would be a challenge alright to keep it handling as it does normally. Maybe invest in some super light camping stuff ;)
I try to keep things minimal, no stove, eat cold/salads, drink water (or beer!) My (Triumph)franken-Legend doesn't do too bad, but it's starting 35kg heavier than an STR (& I don't weigh much). Doesn't have the top end either (~80hp), but it's hard to get it below 55mpg. (Suspension is USD forks & shock of ZXR Kawas - very good.)

I believe what you say is true of Honda's usual quality on suspension, but I don't think the video is lying. It rather looks like they designed the NC first to be a (decent enough) maxi scooter platform whilst really hammering the ticket price down. Something had to give. Anyhow, another test ride will tell you if it's good enough or not. Good luck with your deliberations :)

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Joined: 20/01/2012
Re: HONDA NC700X

v_m. Let's not argue about this any further. My point was that I agree in general that lighter bikes are better handling, hence my purchase last year of a Street Triple R. It could well have been a Duke 690 but I didn't like the feel of a large single cylinder and poor brakes compared to the Triumph. However, in this instance a lighter NC would possibly be worse. The weight is down low so if it was indeed a 'normal' bike with weight higher up lighter would be OK. It seems to me that if the NC was designed with no low down weight it's handling would be awful. It feels as light at the top when riding as any 170 kg bike. It's just such a new idea on weight placement and engine design that we have a problem accepting what it is. I was the same until I rode it. I think Honda have done a great job in making it feel like a proper bike, the low rev limit aside of course.

vroum_ninou
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Joined: 14/03/2010
Re: HONDA NC700X

There's no reason why a lighter bike should have a higher center of gravity than a heavier bike and in any case a higher center of gravity tends to make for better handling bikes (cf sport bikes).
I'm pretty sure that a 120kg, 50hp Honda CRF 450 supermoto handles better than a 230kg, 50 hp Honda NC700, however low the latter's CG might be.

That is not to say that the NC700 handles badly. It might even handle better than most 230kg motorcycles and some slightly lighter bikes. But if KTM can make a 150kg 700cc motorcycle, I think that mighty honda should be able to make a 200kg 700cc motorcycle. That's 50 more kg to play with! That's plenty to be able to place the CG as low as you want and get even better handling and fuel economy.

I have no problem with the low rev limit, I like singles and I loved the Buell XB12S Lightning and its big torque in its 4000 to 6000 rpm power band. But then again... it was a light bike.

Rocker66
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Joined: 11/05/2011
Re: HONDA NC700X

It's interesting to note that the most positve comments on this bike are from those that have actually ridden it. I will reserve my judgement until after my test ride on Wednesday