Ride for Kevin Ash

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Captain Scarlet
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This Memorial Weekend, Mrs. Scarlet and I took a 3-day road trip to the Smoky Mountain range betwixt Georgia, North Carolina and Tennessee, in memory of Kevin Ash.

At times it felt like he might had been stood on the apex, arms folded and smiling, as we scythed our way rockin' and rollin' from bend to bend on the 50's emulating Road King Classic. Slaying The Dragon and it's 318 curves in just 11 miles, felt like a fitting tribute.

Here's to you Kevin...

http://s1128.photobucket.com/user/Diavel666/slideshow/Ride%20For%20Kevin

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Captain Scarlet
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Re: Ride for Kevin Ash

May 25, 2013

JAG
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Re: Ride for Kevin Ash

Hello Captain Scarlet,

Thanks so much for posting your pictures.

Very well done and a nice tribute to Kevin.

Your H-D is one nice looking bike. I very much like the paint job. Very classy looking bike. No windscreen?

There is so much more to biking than just the bike, isn't there. If you slow down you can relax and enjoy the experience. Your big easy Harley is just about perfect for that kind of touring.

Thanks again,

JAG

malauder
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Re: Ride for Kevin Ash

Thank you Captain Scarlet, for your thoughts and your tribute ride. You are one ahead of us, but we are about to make an announcement, real soon now, regarding an event here which is firming up for 9th August at Silverstone. Look out everybody for further details.
Thanks
Mark

Navy Boy
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Re: Ride for Kevin Ash

I look forward to hearing what you have in store Mark. I for one will be making sure that I keep 9 Aug free.

Captain Scarlet
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Re: Ride for Kevin Ash

Your H-D is one nice looking bike. I very much like the paint job. Very classy looking bike. No windscreen?
... thank you JAG. When I ride the Harley with the wife on the back I'm rarely troubling 70 mph and so I thought I'd try this trip with the screen off (increased wind pressure / but less buffeting), especially as daytime temps were hitting high 80's F / 20's C.

One beauty of the bike, is that the screen, sissy-bar, rear rack, rider's back rest and the leather covered hard saddlebags are all quick-detach; so they can be whipped off (or fitted) in seconds (relative term) without the need for any tools. This makes it pretty versatile when wanting to switch between kitchen sink tourer and boulevard bar-hopper modes. Not everyone will agree, but I get on very well with the very tall stock windshield and so generally leave that on. It would have been nice in the bit-chilly mornings this weekend, but might have made me a bit too hot come mid afternoon. Having the panniers is just brilliant really. They're not the biggest (bit thin), but with a 50L case strapped to the rack it didn't really matter, but being able to wear a warm fleece on a chilly morning and then having somewhere to stuff the fleece whilst retrieveing a bottle of water at the same time as the midday temps begin to hit you is downright convenient compared with rucksacks, tank bags, waistband bags and what not.

There is so much more to biking than just the bike, isn't there. If you slow down you can relax and enjoy the experience. Your big easy Harley is just about perfect for that kind of touring.
... people's concept of 'touring' differs. I know people who think it means crushing continents at 125 mph+, which is their prerogative. But for me, touring means that it's better to travel than arrive. And that to truly appreciatte what you pass, you need a modicum or time to take that in, which means regular breaks and a more legal speed limits type approach. I like chatting to people I meet on the way, be they fellow travellers or shop keepers. I just don't think that being the fastest man in the whole damn cemetery is truly in synch with the touring ethos. We didn't trouble the law with our sedatory travel. However, that's not to say that we weren't able to make good steady progress as some might say. The heavily laden King had no problem despatching cars, cruisers and long-vehicle trucks. And because the seat is Chesterfield thick, our backs were gently supported, the tank range about 250 miles, and the cruise control often invoked, it meant that we didn't 'have' to stop for fuel or leg stretches as often as we might on more dynamic types of bikes; meaning we could despatch with the first couple of hundred miles of the day easily as quickly as I used to on one of my Speed Triples for instance, when I wasn't so conscious of whatever the odometer reading... ahem. :-D

During the trip I did have to perform an emeregency stop. And although the ABS didn't really protest much, it is a heavy beast to stop profficiently compared with the BMW's I've owned. But, all things considered, it was a nice trip and a nice bike to do it on. Rather than watching the movie, it felt like I was in it. I think that if Kevin could have joined us for this trip, that he'd of chosen the new Guzzi California as his cool travelling steed, and that would have fitted right in perfectly. Perhaps he's up there now, persuading God to switch brands? I couldn't really see him telling God what he wanted to hear, it would be all 'straight talking' from Kev!

JAG
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Re: Ride for Kevin Ash

Hey, Captain Scarlet,

CS wrote:

"people's concept of 'touring' differs. I know people who think it means crushing continents at 125 mph+, which is their prerogative. But for me, touring means that it's better to travel than arrive. And that to truly appreciatte what you pass, you need a modicum or time to take that in, which means regular breaks and a more legal speed limits type approach."

Wise words, I could not have said it better myself.

Thank you

JAG

Navy Boy
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Re: Ride for Kevin Ash

CS

Your words have made me think of the rideout my wife and I did last weekend. We were on our Harleys, her on the 883 Low and me on my XR1200.

What you say about lower speeds giving higher rewards really does ring true. I think the fastest I went during the 2 days was 70 Mph but we took in the scenery and actually experienced more of the countryside we were in.

Nice machine by the way. I'd have loved to do the ride with you to be honest - Jealous!

shuggiemac
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Re: Ride for Kevin Ash

Hello Captain - I have not been posting here for a long time though I visit most days. Just wanted to say that is a nice looking machine you have there and speaking bluntly I would normally not be admiring anything with white wall tyres in such a way but the overall package does look very nice. Maybe I am getting as old as you :-)

Captain Scarlet
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Re: Ride for Kevin Ash

Thanks guys.

Yes, Navy Boy; bikes with active suspension and tailorable traction control parameters quickly creapt up on us all and life became all very HP4 serious all of a sudden. The RKC hides it's cable-less throttle and indicator cancellation gyroscope tech-conveniences well enough, whilst still engaging the rider to a much more straight forwards by-gone era. It's not Royal Enfield or Ural rustic as such, but it does at least remind of days gone by, when as far skinnier teenager we'd 'race' (read 30mph) around the (always) sunny, country lanes of our youth, on a FS1E or AP50 perhaps; loving every second of our new found freedom and having the time to breathe in the constantly changing view and summer smells of the great outdoors. It successfully sowed the seeds of experiencing to appreciatte this great passion of ours. Bikes eh? Love'em.

Good to hear from you Shuggs. I surpassed 47 this year, but I think I've aged considerably in the last two. I find myself sometimes looking at trikes and allowing myself a brief thought of, 'ooh, that looks comfy!,' before bringing myself back down to Diavel-esque type realities. The technically poorly designed generic 103ci engine in HD's now, are smooth and have the right look, feel and sound, that for my money only Ducati can offer a credible alternative to. I think RIC really likes the 110 ci big-bore mill in his CVO variant. I'm not sure white-walls would work as well on say the Diavel as the RKC. But I do think that wire wheels and a bullet shaped tail unit (think BMW Concept Ninety), could look tremendous! Here's looking to you Roland Sands...

shuggiemac
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Re: Ride for Kevin Ash

I am lucky enough to be blessed with the space, some resource and the experience to have built up a fairly eclectic collection of machines and I think I am in a good place now. As my mood may take me I can pluck a toy to satisfy that days whims. That all sounds grander than it is of course as most of the collection, with the exception of The Diavel, 999 and the Monkeystrada are at least ten years old and most of them significantly older. US custom spec Bonneville, three wheel Velorex, Monkey bike, classic moto cross, super sport, street performance, fish and chip shop bike. I am a lucky lad to be able to take my pick. There is no doubt that my need for hooning around the place has much diminished but I do like having the 999 for those tracks days when I still need that rush and to do it in a safe environment makes it all the more enjoyable. The Diavel is still a fantastic machine and really I can't think of anything available right now that I would swap it for. I don't feel a need for all the technology on it but at the same time I am also pleased that I am able to have had the opportunity to experience it. I feel myself being pulled more and more into the much older bikes in the garage and the simplicity of the Jawa and CZ two strokes is lighting my fire these days. I also pulled the dismantled 350LC out of boxes last weekend as I want to keep that on my visual radar as one of the next rebuilds.

I actually actively dislike some of the divisions that appear in motorcycling and I absolutely hate the term 'crotch rocket' as it is amlost exclusively used by other motorcycles as a term of derision of another group. I have always been of the opinion that if it has an engine and two (or occasionally three) wheels then that is just fine by me as are all the peeps who ride them.

And thus concludes todays' sermon. Go in peace

Captain Scarlet
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Re: Ride for Kevin Ash

"The Diavel is still a fantastic machine and really I can't think of anything available right now that I would swap it for. I don't feel a need for all the technology on it but at the same time I am also pleased that I am able to have had the opportunity to experience it"
... the Diavel is a very special machine indeed. And although I don't need power modes, I do feel I need the convenience of keyless ignitions, the clarity of TFT screens and the safety of traction control saving my hide. All present and correct on the 11 degree masterpiece. Although passed from my stable two bikes ago now, I still regularly post as a global moderator on the Diavel forum, such is my affection for the Ducati still. Once out of production, I genuinely think that the price of carbon reds (in particular) will slowly continue to increase; unmodified one's will become quite collectable at some point in time.

I do love the look, feel and sound of Harley engines. They just have something that the technically profficent Victory's and Star motorcycles just don't seem to be able to fully embue into their pokier V2 mills. And they have a wonderful, just off idle, effortless gliding delivery about them. But I also loved the top-end racous rush of the S1000RR engine too. There's nothing wrong with big hp in-line fours that actually have a bit of delivery character about them. They are few and far between of course, but the SRR actually has it, in the same way a MKI Blade had it too. Like a Harley, not too clinically smooth delivery wise, and all the better for feeling the semi-cosseted internals struggling to break free.

But out of the probable 200 or so bikes that I've now ridden, I think the three best road engines I've tried, has to have been the: Speed Triple 1050, K1300S and Diavel. Those three bikes blend an almost perfect mix of appropriatte gearing, wide-spread high torque, linear smoothness and sheer any-gear or revs go, that simply make you smile. I hadn't actually thought about it. But for my sheckles, they are simply the best four, triple and twin engines of all time... so far!

Navy Boy
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Re: Ride for Kevin Ash

CS

I'm with you on the Triumph 1050 motor. My Sprint ST and GT are both defined by that motor and it has a pretty much perfect power delivery for what I want to use it for.

As for the Harley motors - Yep they do get under your skin don't they? My XR 1200 isn't fast but does have a certain something.

Funny thing this visceral appeal!

Captain Scarlet
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Re: Ride for Kevin Ash

01 . 22 . 2013

CCM
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Re: Ride for Kevin Ash

01.22.2013